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What’s the Weak Link in Your Training?

Posted on Thu, Feb 14, 2013 @ 10:02 AM

Mary Smith leads the training and professional development program at CheeseCo. With the company’s recent purchase of Microsoft X as its computer operating system, Mary’s been charged with bringing employees of varying proficiencies up to speed on the software.

After a quick evaluation of employee skill levels, Mary devises a three-part learning plan and assigns individuals to a track most commensurate with their ability. She will use the learning plans to monitor employees’ progress in completing the training.

image of weak, nerdy guy with fighting glovesFor step one of the training, Mary uploads an introductory, instructional video that covers the basics of the system. Through the learning plan, Mary assigns new employees and those unfamiliar with Microsoft X to view the video as the first step of their training, and provides them with a code that gives them online access to the presentation. She is able to monitor online who, among those assigned, has viewed the video and who hasn’t.

The second part of training – which is offered at different times to accommodate employees’ work schedules, learning plans and computer lab availability – entails hands-on classroom instruction. Mary asked prospective instructors to upload samples of their presentations so she could choose the most appropriate for the training program. Employees register online for the session that best fits their schedule and learning plan timeline.

The third and final component of the training program requires employees to demonstrate their abilities with the new software by completing a project on their computers and uploading the file into a training page specifically created for the occasion by Mary. She is then able to assess their knowledge of the software. Employees complete an evaluation form about the training to receive their certificates of completion.

This isn’t some futuristic, expensive or complicated training scenario involving multiple software vendors and system integrations. You only need to look as far as your registration software provider – assuming you are an ABC Signup customer – to access the tools necessary to set-up such a collaborative, well-rounded, on- and offline training process.

With ABC Signup’s registration software, you can create registration questions used to assess skill levels or evaluate a program. One of ABC’s new software options allows you to design learning plans for individuals or groups, assign participants to the plan and monitor their progress. Another option, Media Manager, gives administrators tools to upload multimedia files – such as the introductory video – and control file access and monitor use. A third option enables administrators to set up a page that allows “registrants” (training participants or prospective instructors, in the example above) to upload files into the administrator’s system.

ABC Signup’s complete registration software now offers tools that help administrators deliver strong, comprehensive training programs with no weak links. If you are interested in finding out more about these offerings, please contact us by phone (866.791.8268x0) or e-mail.

Topics: online registration software, registration software, Training, learning management system